Archive for the Punk category

Richard Hell shirt for sale

Shirt with screen print hand-tinted by Richard Hell in 1977.

//Shirt with decorated screen-print on back panel, 1977. Price: £650.//

This Richard Hell shirt – one of 12 produced in 1977 by NY punk photographer Eileen Polk – is currently for sale by UK memorabilia specialists Dig Gallery.

“I picked the image from a photo-session I had done with Eileen,” says Hell. “Then she got on with producing them to be sold in Manic Panic, who also hand-painted each one. ”

Manic Panic was the boutique opened on July 7, 1977 in St Mark’s Place NYC by Tish and Snooky, the sisters who had been singers in the original Blondie line-up and also performed as the Sic F*cks.

More on the shirt, and the opportunity to buy it, here.

Banksy con men ordered to pay £24,000 to victims

Last Wednesday (July 13) at a confiscation hearing at Kingston Crown Court, Grant Champkins-Howard and Lee Parker – who were convicted last year for selling fake artworks in the style of Banksy – were ordered to pay £24,000 as part of a confiscation order issued under the Proceeds of Crime Act.

The money will be paid in compensation to victims of the duo’s online scam, which netted them more than £80,000.

At their trial last year, Champkins Howard and Parker denied conspiracy charges of copying and embellishing punk-era clothing designs by Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood and possessing articles for use in fraud. The court ordered that these charges should lie on file.

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Marco Pirroni’s Winged Western boots

marcobootsblackpink

//Photo courtesy Marco Pirroni.//

Prompted by the appearance of Anello & Davide’s Winged Western boots in a recent post, Marco Pirroni has sent these photos of three pairs he acquired in the late 70s and early 80s.

“These are the boots as worn by Johnny Kidd, Charles Hawtrey in Carry On Cowboy and me,” says Pirroni. “I had my first pair – the pink and black ones – made for me by Anello’s in 1978 and the others in 1980/81.”

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Westwood asserts rights to Let It Rock + Too Fast To Live

west-lir

//Vivienne Westwood (third right) with LIR assistant Addy Isman + Teddy Boys outside 430 King's Road, Chelsea, 1972. Photo: David Parkinson.//

Vivienne Westwood has asserted her rights to the marks Let It Rock, Too Fast To Live Too Young To Die and Worlds End (the names of the shop at 430 King’s Road operated by Westwood and Malcolm McLaren in 1971-72, 1973-74 and 1980 to date respectively).

This is significant. While Worlds End has clearly been Westwood’s since she split with the late McLaren in 1984, they adopted a laissez-faire attitude to enforcing their intellectual property rights to the shop names and dozens of designs created during the 13-year partnership which also included the incarnations of 430 as SEX (1974-76) and Seditionaries (1976-80).

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Polaroids from THE LOOK’s launch party 2001

invite

The first edition of THE LOOK was launched with a party at Astral, Soho, in March 2001.

It was packed to the gills with media, well-wishers and many of the contributors.

Cover stars Pippa + James performed as Shopgirl and the DJs represented different eras covered by the book: Jeff Dexter played his mid-60s Tiles set; Don Letts + Dan Donovan shook the walls with the sounds Don played at The Roxy in 77; Jay Strongman span the early 80s music from The Dirtbox; and Count Indigo the 90s loungecore scene centred on his Madame Jo-Jo’s club Indigo.

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Memories of SEX in Forum magazine

Steve Jones, Unknown, Alan Jones, Chrissie Hynde, Jordan, Vivienne Westwood. Photo: David Dagley/Rex Features.

On the new blog I’ve posted a piece based on exclusive interviews with writer Len Richmond and photographer David Dagley about the article on SEX in Forum magazine in the mid-70s.

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Westwood: NYT Style screen test

430 King’s Road pictorial on new blog

A pictorial tracking the incarnations of 430 King’s Road since the early 60s has been posted on my new blog.

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Anna Sui exclusive: Interview, book preview + archive gems

anna-cover

To coincide with the publication of the Anna Sui book, today THE LOOK publishes an exclusive interview with the New York designer.

Sui has also granted us access to these gems from deep in her archive: sketches which resulted in early 80s stagewear for Siouxsie Sioux.

anna-drawings

anna-redhead+siouxsie

anna-siouxsiegermanmag

Sui developed her fascination for the dynamics of music and style early.

“I grew up in the suburbs of Detroit dreaming about the British invasion, The Beatles and The Stones,” she says.

“My first concert was MC5 and The Stooges in a park, then along came Glam Rock and I was smitten. It wasn’t just the band that dressed up, but the audience too!  Alice Cooper was my favourite.  Todd Haynes captured that excitement at the beginning of Velvet Goldmine.”

<a href="http://youtube.com/watch?v=V87hoJvdT9A" onclick="javascript:pageTracker._trackPageview('/outbound/article/youtube.com');">http://youtube.com/watch?v=V87hoJvdT9A</a>

//Todd Haynes captures the excitement at 4.20.//

Sui’s family visited New York every summer. One year they took in  the Biba boutique in Bergdorf Goodman.  “I was astounded by the colour selection of cosmetics, boots, t-shirts and beautiful clothes; I’d never seen colours like that:  Dusty teal, plum, prune, rose…

“I bought a teal t-shirt with billowy sleeves – like the blouse I had seen on Jean Shrimpton when she came to Detroit for a Yardley cosmetics appearance – and teal eye shadow.”

Sui graduated via the NYC punk scene to create a small collection “for rock stars as well people that went to rock concerts”, selling through department stores and Patricia Field’s boutique on 8th Street.

In the early 80s Sui brought her “Rock and Roll Cowboy” range to London, when Siouxsie acquired the fringe jacket and skirt with faux-cowhide yoke.

While in London Sui caught Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood’s Pirates collection. “I went to the launch party and the next day bought an entire outfit from Worlds End,” she recalls. “At this time Gene Krell had a clothing boutique in the back of a record store, also on 8th, at MacDougal.  Gene bought my collection, as did Trash & Vaudeville.”

Sui’s customers have run the rock & roll gamut, and she retains a fan’s enthusiasm for the artefacts of rock fashion, as regular readers will know from her recent contribution to this site.

As an addendum to that, here is a charming card for Betsy Bunky  & Nini from Sui’s personal collection:

bbncard

Among Sui’s most prized possessions is a complete run of the Hearst Corporation’s short-lived late 60s pop culture magazine Eye. “It covered fashion, music and film with a poster most issues,” she says.

eyes

//Eye magazine, clockwise from top left: Aug 68; Sept 68; Oct 68; March 69.//

“This was a very different time when information traveled in a much slower way.  Any glimpse of what was going on in London or a story about a rock star was precious and went a long way in your imagination.”

Sui also collects vintage Ossie Clark and Zandra Rhodes.  “I missed it the first time around so I’m making up for it now. I like their earlier pieces and wear them a lot. I’ve also collected the subsequent collections for various retailers recently and Zandra has made me a dress in my favorite feather print.”

anna-jackspread

It is this enthusiam for the keynotes of fashion history which propels Sui into making the smart choices, especially when it comes to fabric selection, palette control and photographic collaboration, from her good friend Steven Meisel to the fantastic(al) Sarah Moon.

anna-madspread

anna-twigspread

anna-mohairspread

Sui’s post-modern appeal is outlined by Jack White (whose wife Karen Elson is a favourite model of the designer’s) in his foreword to Sui’s fully illustrated 288-page tome (which is launched in the UK next week).

“It’s not retro or emulation or re-creation or even false modernity,” White writes of Sui’s aesthetic. “It is a beauty that can exist in any era – past, present or future – a beauty that does not fall prey to the wrath of novelty.”

Buy your copy of Anna Sui’s new book here.

430: Too Fast To Live Too Young To Die

tf1

The early 70s in England weren’t as culturally bereft as pundits would have it, particularly if you were lucky enough to live in London.

The evening news magazine TV show Nationwide (BBC1) and Thames TV’s local programme Today could always be relied upon to report from the far side (usually accidentally in their search for quirky stories).

Historically overshadowed as the siting of “the Bill Grundy incident“, Today featured many such off-beat items, usually sourced by hip researchers/occasional presenters Janet Street-Porter and  Lyndall Hobbs.

Part of the Australian invasion of London during that period along with such other King’s Road habitues as Richard O’Brien and Nell Campbell, Hobbs was particularly spot-on.

With Grundy and Eammon Andrews rotating nightly as studio anchormen, Today’s regular roving reporter was Monty Modlyn, a self-styled schlemeil prone to shouting Tubby Isaac’s cry from his popular  jellied eel stall in Islington: “All the jell’!”

Guess you had to be there.

And so to this clip dug from the British Pathe archive.

tf2tf3tf4tf5

The 25-second reel is likely to stem from 1972, when Malcolm McLaren created the new incarnation for 430 King’s Road in reaction to the sartorial and social conservatism of Let It Rock’s neo-Edwardian customers.

Along with the new Ton Up lines of leather jeans and rocker tees, TFTL continued to stock creepers and take orders for drapes, hence the two Ernies lurking outside. Behind them, the shop’s previous name is visible studded into the back of a motorcycle jacket (and  the new gear continued to be stitched with Let It Rock labels, like this shirt bought in 1973).

Let-It-Rock-shirt

Right at the end of the clip, Monty Modlyn enters the scene to interview the Teds. Pathe says this footage was not broadcast. I don’t recall it. By the look of the end-frames there was hair in the gate or somesuch so it was likely to have been deemed unusable.

In the context of 430 King’s Road Modlyn’s name cropped up a couple of years later – on the “wrong” side of the You’re Gonna Wake Up And Know What Side Of The Bed You’ve Been Lying On! tee, between right-wing journalist Peregrine Worsthorne (the second person to say “fuck” on British TV before the Pistols Steve Jones became the third in 1976) and Angry Young Man John Braine.

You can see the Pathe clip here

On Youtube it has been stuck non-chronogically at the end of film of DAs being sculpted at British barbers in the 50s:

<a href="http://youtube.com/watch?v=SRkGgHMMpp8" onclick="javascript:pageTracker._trackPageview('/outbound/article/youtube.com');">http://youtube.com/watch?v=SRkGgHMMpp8</a>

Janette Beckman: Archive of Attitude

Hip-hop-artifacts

Archive of Attitude is the current exhibition from photographer Janette Beckman at LA gallery Project Space.

project-space-b&w

On until September 5, the show spans Beckman’s work from the late 70s to the current day and incorporates personal artefacts relating to the areas she has worked in, such as hip-hop and punk.

“The Hip Hop exhibit has my Def Jam jacket (with my name embroidered on the front, circa 1987), The Face 1984 with my Run DMC & Posse photo, a Salt ‘n’ Pepa CD cover I shot around ‘87, a Run DMC single with my photo, Adidas sneakers and sweats and my Kangol hat.”

Here are a few of THE LOOK’s favourites from Beckman’s archive:

boy

//Boy, 153 King's Road, London, 1980.//

Christos & Chris

//Chris Sullivan + Christos Tolera, Blue Rondo a la Turk, London, 1982.//

SKA GIRLS Coventry 1980

//Ska girls, Coventry, 1980.//

johnson's 1

//Inside: Phil, stockroom, Robot, King's Road, London, 1980.//

johnson's 5

//Outside: Johnsons, 406 King's Road, London, 1981.//

“The bands and the fans, I loved the music and the styles,” says Beckman, who recently completed a shoot for Schott in Japan in the style of her punk portraits.

These feature a variety of NYC characters shot on location around the city: DJs, dancers, actors, skateboarders, BMX riders, artists and musicians.

actor-chad-2

//Chad (actor) NYC 2010.//

ralphy

//Ralphy (BMX) NYC 2010.//

band us royalty

//US Royalty (band) NYC 2010.//

Dister dancer

//Dister (dancer) NYC 2010.//

artist-brian

//Brian (artist) NYC 2010.//

Go see:
Archive of Attitude
Project Space
603 North La Brea Avenue
Los Angeles CA 90036
Telephone +1 323 938 8818

Visit:
http://www.janettebeckman.com/

British Remains: “We hate everything”

British Remains: “They couldn’t find anything decent anyone else was doing THEY DID IT THEMSELVES!”

//Teenagers from London’s Kentish Town and Tufnell Park: “We hate everything.”//

//London Brick//

//Vacant//

//Generation X front//

//Generation X back//

//Vacant bag//

British Remains:

Tel 01 230 1212

Site www.britishremains.co.uk

Contacts: info@britishremains.co.uk/sales@britishremains.co.uk

Malcolm McLaren’s role in Banksy trial

THE LOOK can reveal that the late Malcolm McLaren was to be a witness for the prosecution in the trail which has resulted in suspended jail sentences for conmen Grant Champkins Howard of Croydon, south London and Lee Parker, of Eastbourne, Sussex.

At Kingston Crown Court yesterday (July 1), the  pair were each handed 12-month suspended sentences for selling fake Banksy prints on eBay.

“Neither of you should be under any illusion that I regard both of you as nothing more than a pair of old-fashioned conmen,” said Judge Suzan Matthews, who ordered the pair to complete 240 hours of unpaid work in the next 12 months and imposed restraining orders preventing them from selling on the internet.

Parker, 45, and Champkins-Howard, 44, pleaded guilty to selling copies of genuine numbered prints on eBay, earning £57,000 over a three-year period.

Prosecutor Richard Mandel said they passed off the copies as being from official limited-edition numbered print runs made early on in the artist’s career, forging ownership documents and adding official numbers and stamps to some, which were sold for up to £2,000.

The Metropolitan Police recovered 120 prints during the investigation which, if sold as genuine, could have fetched £200,000-plus.

Champkins Howard and Parker denied conspiracy charges of copying and embellishing clothing by Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood and possessing articles for use in fraud.

It was this aspect of the case for which McLaren supplied testimony on behalf of the prosecution. His death in April – and Westwood’s unwillingness to comment – are understood to have been factors in the decision  for those charges to be ordered to lie on file.

Banksy forgers plead guilty

Art forgers Grant Champkins-Howard, 44, and Lee Parker, 45, face jail sentences after confessing to selling fake prints by guerilla artist Banksy on eBay at Kingston Crown Court last Friday (June 4).

Charges in the separate case against the pair alleging the manufacture and distribution of fake 70s designs by the late Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood lie on file.

THE LOOK will not be publishing comments on this post.

Exclusive: Amazing BOY pieces in 80s vintage sale

Here is a exclusive selection of images from a vintage 80s fashion collection going up for private sale this week.

 

The vendor is selling a prime collection of streetwear, including key pieces from the Chelsea boutique BOY.

As detailed in Chapter 21 of  THE LOOK, BOY was opened at 151 King’s Road in the spring of 1977 by  John Krevine and Steph Raynor in the wake of McLaren and Westwood’s Seditionaries (unveiled at 430 King’s Road in December 1976).

These days original BOY clothing in good condition is much sought-after.  The pieces in this collection date from 1982 onward.

The so-called black cotton “bondage dress” is a multi-layered wonder complete with straps, apron, metallic poppers, an attached belt, plastic buckles and adjustable three quarter-length sleeves.

Dating from 1983 is a roll-collared cream and orange batwing sleeved top with Japanese script.

A black and gold chemise dates from 1985, when BOY’s designs chimed with the developing clubwear aesthetic.

This is when BOY was championed by Boy George, who appeared in many BOY designs, posed for the boutique’s catalogue and even created a couple of t-shirts.

A red-on-black crew-necked sweater is also from this period. The vendor also has printed BOY stockings, leggings, and other items. as well as garments from labels such as Fiorucci and WilliWear.

Inquiries to the vendor may be made via THE LOOK.