Archive for the 30s category

Paris: Capital Of The XXIst Century

malcolm in Newcastle

It’s a year since we were at the premiere screening of Paris: Capital Of The XXIst Century at The Baltic in Gateshead.

The sequenced film is an unforgettable piece of art, and that was an unforgettable night. Afterwards Malcolm talked about his home in Paris, art and a whole lot more with Michael Bracewell.

Sharpies: Top fellas and brushes

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Sharpies outside Young & Jackson Hotel, Melbourne, 1972.

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Above and below: pages from Top Fellas by Tadhg Taylor.

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Last year’s Youtube posting of this excerpt from Greg Macainsh’s 1974 film about sharpies coincided with a revival of interest in the tough and stylish Australian music/fashion youth cult which sprang from Melbourne’s blue collar suburbs.

Tadhg Taylor’s definitive book Top Fellas tracks the “two-fisted, two-decade” history of sharp from its emergence (parallel to mod in the UK) through successive and distinctive Oz responses to skinhead, glam and punk.

The roots of sharp lie in the influx of European immigrants in Australia in the early 60s. “Randy” says: “I came to Adelaide from England in 1959. I became a mod when I was in high school. I’d say in a class of thirty about twenty five would’ve been British, working class from the North and the Midlands. Every three weeks a new boatload of immigrants would arrive and the kids would tell us about the latest fashions and bands. Consequently we were never that far behind what was happening in England.”

Taylor adds: “British mod kids that quit Adelaide for Melbourne were a key influence on the birth of sharp.”

With first-hand testimony from former sharps and brushes (girls) linked by his lively text, Taylor’s book emphasises the importance of clothes to these hard-nuts.

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Rod of The Oakleigh Boys (and son), Melbourne, 1969.

“A lot of blokes dressed real fancy, suits with short European jackets and velvet collars, but they weren’t mods and they were rough as guts working class,” says “Martin” about the styles of the mid 60s.

According to Taylor, the “killer elite” were the Top Fellas: “To be a Top Fella you had to be handy in a blue (fight), hell on the dance floor, cocksure with a brush and dapper as all get-out.”

Angry Anderson, later of Rose Tattoo, recalls “twin-sets were huge, the matching Crest knit (jersey knit) and cardigan – maroon, silver-grey, royal blue or chocolate brown. I remember guys who’d only wear one colour or had complete outfits in one colour. In recent years I’ve tried to re-adopt the look but it’s very hard to find a twin-set for a guy! I went into storage and the only items of clothing I had left was my Bokka coat, three-quarter length, flap pockets, hound’s-tooth black, white and grey. I can barely get it on.”

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Oak Park Boot Boys, Middle Brighton Station, 1973.

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Sharp boy and girl, central Melbourne, 1967.

By the early 70s tattoos and earrings (left ear only) were de rigeur, as were Staggers jeans (flared but snug on the hip), singlets, fluffy moccasins, treads (sandals with bright-coloured suede uppers with soles cut from car tyres) and the short-on-top, rat’s-tails-at-the-back haircut.

The most significant garment was the Conny – a tight-fit cardigan designed by Mr Conti, a Greek clothier in Thornbury (just across the street from the site of Taylor and his wife’s second-hand bookshop Fully Booked).

“Connys came in a variety of styles, some had thin pocket flaps on each side of the chest, most had five buttons and stripes,” writes Taylor. “They always had a small belt buttoned at the base of the back, same size as the pocket flaps, about three inches long and one inch wide. Pretty soon kids started bringing in their own designs, sparing no expense to wow their mates with new patterns and colour combinations.”

“Chris”, one of The Camberwell Junction Boys in 1970 , says: “We got Cuban-heeled shoes made at Venus, Kosmanos and Acropolis. The cardigan thing carried on…we mostly wore jeans, with a Crest knit or a Penguin. The girls wore pastel coloured ‘Elta’ cardigans made by an old lady with buttons shaped like bunnies. They also wore strap-on school shoes and later clogs.”

While Slade and Bowie were accepted by the early 70s sharps,  they revered the homegrown hard-rock played by Billy Thorpe & The Aztecs, Skyhooks (formed by Macainsh), Rose Tattoo, and in particular, The Coloured Balls.

That band’s charismatic leader was the late lamented Lobby Loyd. His 60s band The Purple Hearts had attracted the first wave of sharpies: “I started noticing all these strange people. I’d never seen anything like them, a distinct style. They had short hair and wore baggy trousers and cardigans. The girls wore knee-length pleated skirts, twin-sets and pearls. They were incredible to play to and had their own way of dancing.”

The MC5-inspired The Coloured Balls played long work-outs such as God (the soundtrack in the clip from Macainsh’s film). “The sharps would do dance routines and to watch it you’d think you were at the New York Metropolitan watching some bizarre modern ballet,” said Loyd.

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Chris O’Hooligan and The Camberwell Junction Boys, 1970.

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West Side and Melbourne sharps, St Kilda football match, 1978.

Sharp fizzled out in the early 80s due to a variety of factors, not least the increasing usage of guns to settle scores. The last big shout is adjudged to have been AC/DC’s homecoming concert at Melbourne’s Myer Music Bowl on the Back In Black 1981 tour.

By all accounts it was mayhem. “Every sharp in Melbourne would’ve been there, they went berserk, smashed all the trains and trams, pulled the cops off their horses, a riot,” says “Chris”. “I got smacked in the mouth and ran for my life. By this stage I was into punk, the ballroom, speed, to me these kids with their moccasins and Bon Scott RIP t-shirts, they weren’t sharpies, they were just headbangers.”

Now sharp is back.

This summer an exhibition dedicated to the cult was held at Melbourne’s Kustom Lane Gallery, while Chane Chane – a contributor to Taylor’s book whose glam-punk band La Femme is seen as the great lost sharpie act – leads the City Sharps.

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Copies of Top Fellas: The Story Of Melbourne’s Sharpie Cult are available here – the Custom Book Centre says that they’ll do a deal for international  cost postage to be equal to Australia-only mail (so approximately half the usual freight charges).

Broken Hearts go Beyond The Valley

Currently available from London’s Beyond The Valley (as well as ASOS and Farfetch) is the first collection from dynamic DJs, recording artistes and gals-about-town Broken Hearts.

  

Taking their inspiration from an unlikely source – Tod Browning’s 1932 classic Freaks – Amber Jane Butchart and Nisha Thirkell have concocted a capsule range of capes, blouses, playsuits, tops, shorts and dresses pitching frills, bows and a print of their faces against solid blacks and reds.

 <a href="http://youtube.com/watch?v=bBXyB7niEc0">http://youtube.com/watch?v=bBXyB7niEc0</a>

And the duo tell us they have now finished the SS10 range for BTV and are about to start on AW10/11. Busy, busy.

 

 

Forthcoming DJ dates include London’s East Rooms, Bern’s Bonsoir Club and the Beyond The Valley Christmas Party in Newburgh Street.

 

//All shoes Terry de Havilland// 

We’ve had a sneak preview of Amber and Nisha’s new album Musical Theatre; it’s excellent and delivers on the promise shown by their fantastic debut single of a couple of years back, Black Cat/Bianco.

 <a href="http://youtube.com/watch?v=t5ciUpKuFlE">http://youtube.com/watch?v=t5ciUpKuFlE</a>

Meantime you can keep up to date with Broken Hearts’ antics on their blog.